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Collective and Cultural Memory

Intagible definition

Memory comes directly from Latin memora “memory, remembrance, faculty of remembering,” abstract noun for memor, “mindful, remembering”.

According to the Nara Document + 20, memory is embodied by information sources such as “all physical, written, oral, and figurative sources that underlie the understanding and appreciation of nature, specificities, meaning, and transmission of cultural heritage”.

Marc Augè considers the place (landscapes, cities, buildings, and monuments) as a memory keeper (2006). The tangible assets are not only voluntary monuments but all the expressions of man activities as “part of the cultural formation of their inhabitants and their social belonging” (Augé, 2008). All physical and figurative sources are expressions of tangible values such as collective memories, condition behaviours and create habits. Buildings and human traces in Landscapes “make places recognizable and allow the identification of cultural assets and individual and collective memory.” (Augé, 2008)

Charter and legislative examples:

2019. UNESCO – World Heritage Centre. Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage 

Convention; WHC.19/01; UNESCO:  Paris, France. Available at: https://whc.unesco.org/en/guidelines/ [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

COUNCIL, O. E. (2005). Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society. Rada Europy, Strasbourg

 

2001. UNESCO – Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, 2 November 2001, available at: https://www.refworld.org/ docid/435cbcd64.html [accessed 29 July 2021]

 

1994. The Nara Document on Authenticity. [ebook] Nara: ICOMOS – International Council on Monuments and sites. Available at: https://www.icomos.org/charters/nara-e.pdf [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

1972. UNESCO – Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, 16 November 1972, available at: https://www.refworld.org/docid/4042287a4.html [accessed 29 July 2021]

 

1964. INTERNATIONAL CHARTER FOR THE CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION OF MONUMENTS AND SITES (THE VENICE CHARTER 1964). Venice: ICOMOS – International Council on Monuments and sites. Available at: https://www.icomos.org/charters/venice_e.pdf [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

Edited book example:

Augé, M. (2008). Non-places: Introduction to an anthropology of supermodernity. London: Verso. 

 

Nora, P. (1984). Les lieux de mémoire. Paris: Gallimard.

 

Book referencing examples:

Fiorani D., Franco G., Kealy L., Musso S. F., Calvo- Salve M. A. (Ed. By). (2019). CONSERVATION CONSUMPTION – PRESERVING THE TANGIBLE AND INTANGIBLE VALUES. Published by EAAE, Hasselt Belgium. ISBN 978-2-930301-67-9. Available here [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

Fiorani D., Kealy L., Musso S. F.. (2017) CONSERVATION ADAPTATION – KEEPING ALIVE THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE ADAPTIVE REUSE OF HERITAGE WITH SYMBOLIC VALUE 2nd Edition. Published by: EAAE,Hasselt, Belgium. ISBN978-2-930301-66-2. Available here [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

Crisan R., Fiorani D., Kealy L., Musso S. F.. (2015) CONSERVATION – RECONSTRUCTION

Small Historic Centres Conservation In The Midst Of Change. Published by: EAAE,Hasselt, Belgium. EAAE Transaction on Architectural Education no. 64. ISBN978-2-930301-63-1. Available here [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

Kealy L., Musso S. F.. (2011). CONSERVATION / TRANSFORMATION Published by: EAAE, Leuven, Belgium. EAAE Transaction on Architectural Education no. 52. ISBN978-2-930301-50-. Available here [Accessed 29 July 2021].

 

Musso S. F., De Marco L. (2008). TEACHING CONSERVATION / RESTAURATION OF THE ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE. Published by:EAAE & ENHSA, Genoa. EAAE Transaction on Architectural Education no. 38. ISBN2-930301-35-Χ. Available here [Accessed 29 July 2021].

Author: Sofia Tonello
Iuav Hersus Project Junior Researcher

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